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Tu-95 Tupolev
Tu-95, Tu-142
ASCC codename: Bear
Intercontinental Strategic Bomber

DESCRIPTION:
The Tu-95 is the world's only swept-wing turboprop ever to enter service. Its distinct engines, each with two counter-rotating propellers, also make the Bear the fastest propeller-driven airplane ever built. The original Tu-95 was designed to carry two nuclear bombs to targets in the continental US. Later versions carried cruise missiles for long-ange stand-off missions. The Bear has also been used for reconnaissance, especially by the Soviet/Russian Navy which used the aircraft to track US aircraft carrier task forces. A specialized variant of the Bear is the Tu-142 dedicated to maritime surveillance and anti-submarine warfare. Over 300 Bears were built.

Data below for Tu-95MS
Last modified 13 September 2009

HISTORY:
First Flight September 1952
Service Entry

1956

CREW:

seven: pilot, co-pilot, tailgunner, four others
crew of ten in older models
maximum of 16 personnel possible

ESTIMATED COST:

unknown

AIRFOIL SECTIONS:
Wing Root TsAGI SR-5S
Wing Tip TsAGI SR-5S

DIMENSIONS:
Length 162.42 ft (49.50 m)
Wingspan 167.67 ft (51.10 m)
Height 39.75 ft (12.12 m)
Wing Area 3,330 ft (310.0 m)
Canard Area

not applicable

WEIGHTS:
Empty 198,415 lb (90,000 kg)
Normal Takeoff unknown
Max Takeoff 414,470 lb (188,000 kg)
Fuel Capacity internal: unknown
external: unknown
Max Payload

(Tu-95) 44,090 lb (20,000 kg)
(Tu-142) 25,000 lb (11,340 kg)

PROPULSION:
Powerplant four KKBM Kuznetsov NK-12MV turboprops
Thrust 59,180 shp (44,132 kW)

PERFORMANCE:
Max Level Speed at altitude: 575 mph (925 km/h) at 40,010 ft (12,205 m), Mach 0.87
at sea level: 405 mph (650 km/h), Mach 0.53
Initial Climb Rate unknown
Service Ceiling 39,370 ft (12,000 m)
29,850 ft (9,100 m) with max payload
Range 8,110 nm (15,000 km) with max fuel
g-Limits unknown

ARMAMENT:
Gun one or two 23-mm cannon in tail
Stations one internal weapons bay
Air-to-Surface Missile Kh-20, Kh-22, Kh-26, up to 16 Kh-55
Bomb nuclear bombs
Other (Tu-142) torpedoes, nuclear or conventional depth charges, sonobuoys

KNOWN VARIANTS:
Tu-20 Original designation for the Tu-95/Tu-142 aircraft
Tu-95/1, Tu-95/2 Prototypes
Tu-95M 'Bear-A' First production model carrying two nuclear bombs
Tu-95M-5 Missile carrier model armed with the Kh-26/AS-6 'Kingfish' missile
Tu-95M-55 Missile carrier, details unknown
Tu-95U 'Bear-A' Trainer version based on the Tu-95M
Tu-95K Experimental model used to drop a MiG-19 aircraft in flight in order to test systems for the Kh-20 missile
Tu-95K-20 'Bear-B' Version armed with the Kh-20/AS-3 'Kangaroo' missile and featuring a large, flat nose radar
Tu-95KD Armed with the Kh-20 missile and equipped with an in-flight refueling probe on the nose
Tu-95KM 'Bear-C' Missile carrier model nearly identical to the Tu-95K-20 but fited with additional electronic intelligence equipment
Tu-95RT 'Bear-D' Maritime reconnaissance model with multi-sensor pallets; 45 built
Tu-95MR 'Bear-E' Maritime reconnaissance model with seven cameras located in the weapon bay
Tu-95K-22 'Bear-G' Re-built 'Bear-B' and 'Bear-C' airframes with new avionics and armed with the Kh-22/AS-4 'Kitchen' missile
Tu-95MS 'Bear-H' Armed with the Kh-55/AS-15 'Kent' cruise missile
Tu-95MS-6 'Bear-H6' Armed with six Kh-55 missiles
Tu-95MS-16 'Bear-H16' Armed with 16 Kh-55 missiles
Tu-95MR 'Bear-J' Believed to be a communications relay aircraft
Tu-96 High-speed development aircraft, details unknown
Tu-119 Experimental design to test a nuclear-powered engine, converted from a Tu-95M
Tu-142 'Bear-F' Maritime version introduced in the late 1960s with a longer fuselage and improved engines; 50 built
Tu-142A 'Bear-F Mod 1' Tu-142 variant with a slightly different external shape
Tu-142M 'Bear-F Mod 2' Model with a longer fuselage, redesigned cockpit, and a new infrared probe
Tu-142M2 'Bear-F Mod 3' Model with a new magnetic anomaly detector (MAD)
Tu-142M3 'Bear-F Mod 4' Model with multi-sensor antennae and electronic warfare equipment
Tu-142LL Test aircraft converted from a Tu-142M Mod 3 and used to test engines

KNOWN COMBAT RECORD:

none

KNOWN OPERATORS:

India (Indian Naval Air Squadron)
Russia, Voyenno Vozdushniye Sili (Russian Air Force)
Russia, Aviatsiya Voyenno-Morskoyo Flota Sily Rossii (Russian Naval Aviation)
Ukraine, Viys'kovo-Povitriani Syly Ukrayiny (Ukraine Military Air Forces)
Union of Soviet Socialist Republics, Voyenno Vozdushniye Sili (Soviet Air Force)
Union of Soviet Socialist Republics, Aviatsiya Voyenno-Morskoyo Flota (Soviet Naval Aviation)

3-VIEW SCHEMATIC:

Tu-95


SOURCES:
  • Bishop, Chris, ed. The Encyclopedia of Modern Military Weapons: The Comprehensive Guide to Over 1,000 Weapon Systems from 1945 to the Present Day. NY: Barnes & Noble, 1999, p. 371.
  • Donald, David, ed. The Complete Encyclopedia of World Aircraft. NY: Barnes & Noble, 1997, p. 884, Tupolev Tu-95 and -142.
  • Donald, David and Lake, Jon, ed. The Encyclopedia of World Military Aircraft. NY: Barnes & Noble, 2000, p. 426-430, Tupolev Tu-95/95M 'Bear-A', Tu-95K 'Bear-B/C/G', Tu-95MS 'Bear-H', Tu-95RT/MR 'Bear-D/E', Tu-142 'Bear-F', Tu-142MR 'Bear-J'.
  • Gunston, Bill, ed. The Encyclopedia of Modern Warplanes. NY: Barnes & Noble, 1995, p. 273-275, Tupolev Tu-95 'Bear', Tu-95MS 'Bear', Tu-95 and Tu-142 'Bear-D/E/F/J'.
  • Gunston, Bill, ed. The Osprey Encyclopedia of Russian Aircraft. Oxford, UK: Osprey Publishing, 1995, p. 424-427, Tu-95, Tu-142.
  • Munro, Bob and Chant, Christopher. Jane's Combat Aircraft. Glasgow: Harper Collins Publishers, 1995, p. 230-233, Tupolev Tu-95, Tu-142.
  • Paul Nann's Military Aviation Photo Gallery
  • Taylor, Michael. Brassey's World Aircraft & Systems Directory 1996/1997. London: Brassey's, 1996, p. 100-102, Tupolev Tu-95 (NATO name Bear), Tu-142 (NATO name Bear-F/J).
  • Taylor, Michael J. H. Brassey's World Aircraft & Systems Directory 1999/2000. London: Brassey's, 1999, p. 82-84, Tupolev Tu-95 (NATO name Bear), Tu-142 (NATO name Bear-F/J).





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