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DC-9 Douglas
DC-9
Short to Medium-Range Jetliner

DESCRIPTION:
Douglas began development of the DC-9 in the late 1950s as a jet-powered short-range aircraft to complement its larger DC-8. Although the DC-9 was the first American design to feature the rear-mounted twin podded engines common to the design family, Douglas borrowed the concept from the French Caravelle airliners. Otherwise, the configuration was of a generally traditional layout with a tubular fuselage mated to a low-mounted swept wing. One unusual characteristic was the introduction of a T-tail necessitated by the choice of engine placement.

The 80 to 90 passenger DC-9 Series 10 was the first to enter service, but this basic design was offered in a number of variations made possible by the addition of fuselage plugs for increased passenger or fuel loads. The final Series 50 variant, for example, was some 23 ft (7 m) longer than the original and could carry up to 139 passengers. In addition, several dedicated cargo, convertible, and combined cargo and passenger variants were developed to attract a variety of operators. The program also received a great boost when the US Air Force and US Navy purchased cargo and transport variants known as the C-9. A much larger and re-engined variant, known as the DC-9 Super 80, appeared in the early 1980s but was redesignated the MD-80 following the merger of Douglas with McDonnell.

Between 1965 and 1982, a total of 976 DC-9s were built, and many remain in service having been upgraded to meet new noise regulations.

Last modified 11 April 2011

HISTORY:
First Flight 25 February 1965
Service Entry

8 December 1965 (with Delta Air Lines)

CREW: two flight crew: pilot, co-pilot

PASSENGERS: (DC-9-10) 80 in two classes, 90 in one class
(DC-9-30) 105 in two classes, 119 in one class
(DC-9-40) 125 to 132
(DC-9-50) up to 139

ESTIMATED COST:

unknown

AIRFOIL SECTIONS:
Wing Root DSMA-433/-434A
Wing Tip

DSMA-435A/-436A

DIMENSIONS:
Length (DC-9-10) 104.42 ft (31.86 m)
(DC-9-30) 119.33 ft (36.41 m)
(DC-9-40) 125.58 ft (38.31 m)
(DC-9-50) 133.50 ft (40.73 m)
Wingspan (DC-9-10) 89.42 ft (27.28 m)
(DC-9-20) 93.32 ft (28.47 m)
Height 27.5 ft (8.38 m)
Wing Area 1,000.7 ft (92.97 m)
Canard Area

not applicable

WEIGHTS:
Empty (DC-9-30) 57,190 lb (25,940 kg)
(DC-9-50) 61,880 lb (28,070 kg)
Normal Takeoff unknown
Max Takeoff (DC-9-10) 90,700 lb (41,180 kg)
(DC-9-20) 98,000 lb (44,490 kg)
(DC-9-30) 110,000 lb (49,940 kg)
(DC-9-40) 114,000 lb (51,755 kg)
(DC-9-50) 121,000 lb (54,935 kg)
Fuel Capacity internal:
(DC-9-10) 3,695 gal (13,980 L)
(DC-9-20) 3,680 gal (13,925 L)
(DC-9-50) 4,260 gal (16,120 L)
external: not applicable
Max Payload

(DC-9-30) 31,125 lb (14,120 kg)

PROPULSION:
Powerplant (DC-9-10) two Pratt & Whitney JT8D-7 turbofans
(DC-9-20) two Pratt & Whitney JT8D-9 turbofans
(DC-9-30) two Pratt & Whitney JT8D-15 turbofans
(DC-9-50) two Pratt & Whitney JT8D-17 turbofans
Thrust (DC-9-10) 28,000 lb (124.56 kN)
(DC-9-20) 30,000 lb (133.45 kN)
(DC-9-30) 31,000 lb (137.90 kN)
(DC-9-50) 32,000 lb (142.35 kN)

PERFORMANCE:
Max Level Speed at altitude: unknown
at sea level: unknown
cruise speed:
(DC-9-10) 560 mph (905 km/h)
(DC-9-20) 555 mph (895 km/h)
(DC-9-30) 570 mph (915 km/h)
(DC-9-40) 560 mph (905 km/h)
(DC-9-50) 560 mph (905 km/h)
Initial Climb Rate unknown
Service Ceiling unknown
Range (DC-9-10) 1,100 nm (2,035 km)
(DC-9-20) 1,605 nm (2,975 km)
(DC-9-30) 1,420 nm (2,630 km)
(DC-9-40) 1,460 nm (2,710 km)
(DC-9-50) 1,420 nm (2,630 km)
g-Limits unknown

KNOWN VARIANTS:
DC-9 Series 10 Initial production model
DC-9 Series 15 Same as DC-9-10 but with more powerful engines for operation at higher gross weights
DC-9 Series 20 Model with larger wingspan and more powerful engines for operation in hot/high environments; 147 Series 10, 15 and 20 airframes built
DC-9 Series 30 Enlarged version with lengthened fuselage for up to 119 passengers and larger sing of Series 20 plus more powerful engines, available in freighter (F), convertible (CF) and passenger/freight (RC) models; 621 built
DC-9 Series 40 Same as Series 30 but with lengthened fuselage for up to 132 passengers and new engines, available in freighter (F), convertible (CF) and passenger/freight (RC) models; 71 built
DC-9 Series 50 Same as Series 30 but with lengthened fuselage and revised cabin layout for up to 139 passngers and new engines, available in freighter (F), convertible (CF) and passenger/freight (RC) models; 96 built
DC-9 Super 80 Lengthened model with more fuel efficient engines, later redesignated the MD-80
DC-9 Super 90 Updated version of the MD-80, later redesignated the MD-90
C-9A Nightingale Aeromedical transport based on DC-9 Series 30 and used by US Air Force; 21 built
C-9B Skytrain II Logistics transport based on Series 30 and Series 40 built for US Navy and US Marines; 17 built
VC-9 US Air Force VIP transport based on DC-9 Series 30; 3 built

KNOWN OPERATORS:
Civil 1Time
ABX Air
ADC Airlines
Adria
Aero California
Aerocaribe
Aerolineas Internacionales
Aeromexico
Aeropostal
Aeroquetzal
Aerorepublica Colombia
Air Aruba
Airborne Express
Air Canada
Air Djibouti
Airtran Airways
Air Transport International (ATI)
Air West
Alitalia
Allegheny Airlines
Allegiant Air
Allegro Air
ALM
Aserca
Austral
Avensa
Aviaco
Aviacsa
Avioimpex
Bellview Airlines
Cebu Pacific Air
Championship Airways
Continental Airlines
Delta Air Lines
DHL
Dinar Lineas Aereas
Dominicana
Eastern Airlines
Egyptair
Emery Worldwide
Evergreen International Airlines
Express One International
Finnair
Garuda Indonesia
Ghana Airways
Hawaiian Air
Hughes Airwest
Hunair
Iberia
Inex Adria
Intercontinental Colombia
Itavia
Japan Air System
JAT Yugoslav Airlines
Kitty Hawk Air Cargo
Laser
Legend Airlines
MAT Macedonian Airlines
Merpati
Midway Airlines
Midwest Express
Million Air
North Central Airlines
Northwest Airlines
Ozark Airlines
Reliant Airlines
Ryan International Airlines
SAS Scandinavian Airlines
Servivensa
Setra
Sosolito
Southern Airways
Southwest Airlines
Spantax
Spirit Airlines
Sportsflight Air
Sun Air
Sun Jet International Airlines
Surinam Airways
Taesa
Texas International
THY Turkish Airlines
Toa Domestic Airlines (TDA)
Trans World Airlines (TWA)
US Airways
USA Jet Airlines
Valujet
Viasa
West Coast Airlines
Wetrafa Airlines
Zuliana Airlines
Government/Military Italy, Aeronautica Militare Italiana (Italian Air Force)
Kuwait, al-Quwwat al-Jawwiya al-Kuwaitiya (Kuwaiti Air Force)
United States (US Army Air Force)
United States (US Marine Corps)
United States (US Navy)

3-VIEW SCHEMATIC:

DC-9


SOURCES:
  • Aboulafia, Richard. Jane's Civil Aircraft. Glasgow: Harper Collins Publishers, 1996, p. 76-77, McDonnell Douglas DC-9.
  • Boeing DC-9 site
  • Chant, Christopher and Taylor, Michael J.H. The World's Greatest Aircraft. Edison, NJ: Chartwell Books, 2006, p. 228, Douglas DC-9 and McDonnell Douglas (now Boeing) MD-80/90 Series.
  • Donald, David, ed. The Complete Encyclopedia of World Aircraft. NY: Barnes & Noble, 1997, p. 611-612, McDonnell Douglas DC-9.
  • Donald, David, ed. The Encyclopedia of Civil Aircraft. San Diego, CA: Thunder Bay Press, 1999, p. 609-613, McDonnell Douglas DC-9 and MD-80.
  • Rendall, David. Jane's Aircraft Recognition Guide, 2nd ed. London: Harper Collins Publishers, 1999, p. 222, Boeing (McDonnell Douglas) DC-9.
  • Taylor, Michael. Brassey's World Aircraft & Systems Directory 1996/1997. London: Brassey's, 1996, p. 276-277, McDonnell Douglas DC-9X.





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